Don Quixote – Cumulative Exam

Don Quixote– Cumulative Examination

Which is not a reality about the life of Miguel de Cervantes, author of Don Quixote?
He was misguided into thinking he was a knight.
Before taking part in fight, Don Quixote takes a moment to– applaud himself to his woman love and ask for her help
What does Sancho Panza guarantee to respect “as I would the Sabbath day”?
Don Quixote’s warning about not battling with gentlemen
Don Quixote is generally a parody of– tales of chivalry
Which of the following actions is allowed under the laws of chivalry?
Sancho Panza can take up arms in self-defense against citizens.
arrangements; pieces of food
victuals
limp; loose and flabby
drooping
After his spear is broken, what does Don Quixote use as a replacement?
A branch of a tree
There is no evidence to reveal that Miguel de Cervantes– when met with Shakespeare
Chapter eight of Don Quixote includes the popular scene in which Don Quixote– fights versus a group of windmills
What is the most essential factor for setting a function before checking out?
to offer a focus and therefore avoid being overwhelmed
In The Life of Samuel Johnson, Boswell can be stated to feel what about Johnson?
Wonder
In The Life of Samuel Johnson, which of the following is a strength in Johnson that Boswell praises above others?
imagination
In The Life of Samuel Johnson, the attitude that dominates Boswell’s descriptions of Johnson is
deep reverence.
In The Life of Samuel Johnson, a predominant theme in Boswell’s descriptions of both Johnson’s character and their very first conference is
the sparkle of Johnson’s conversation, wit, and composing.
According to Boswell, why did Johnson in some cases express viewpoints that he did not really believe?
he just liked to dispute
The speaker wonders if the tiger’s developer– feels pride in development
The proportion of “The Tyger” is boosted by the– repeating of the first verse
The speaker in “The Tyger” is
an adult
In “The Tyger” the stars most likely symbolize– angels
In Blake’s poem “The Tyger,” “the forests of the night” most plainly suggest the
turmoil and confusion of living.
In the poem the tiger is compared to __________.
fire, heat, and brightness
In “The Tyger,” what is used as contrast to the tiger?
the lamb
The expression “afraid balance” in the “The Tyger” explains
the tyger’s shape and form
The imagery used in “The Tyger” recommends that the tiger might be
a force of knowledge
The speaker’s attitude towards the tiger can best be referred to as– blown away
In these lines from “The Tyger,” what is Blake more than likely recommending that overcame the stars?
sadness
The speaker in “The Tyger” pictures the animal as having been made in a– blacksmith’s create
In the 4th stanza of “The Tyger,” the creation of the tiger is connected with
ironworking.
A main idea of “The Lamb” is the
generosity of the developer.
Which word finest describes the mood of the above illustration accompanying “The Lamb”?
peaceful
According to the speaker, the lamb is endowed with the qualities of– mildness
In “The Lamb” the speaker’s questions describe the lamb’s– creator
In “The Lamb,” God is primarily portrayed as a
company
The speaker in “The Lamb” describes Christ as a– kid
In the poem “The Lamb,” the lamb is utilized to represent what religious figure?
Christ
Whom does Blake refer to as “He” in “The Lamb”?
the Developer
Which is an abstract idea signified by the lamb in Blake’s poem “The Lamb”?
innocence
What kind of poetry is “The Lamb”?
lyrical
Rather of losing his connection to nature, the speaker would “rather be/ A Pagan.” A pagan is someone who– worships nature
The allusions in “The World Is Excessive with Us” describe– Greek gods
In “The World Is Excessive with United States,” individuals are “out of tune” with
nature.
The speaker of “The World Is Too Much with Us” believes that if he were a pagan, he would be
more responsive to nature.
“The world is too much with us” indicates that– material issues get in the way of people’s gratitude of much deeper things
The speaker compares the winds to– sleeping flowers
In “The World Is Too Much With United States,” the speaker thinks that– worldly striving wastes people’s talents and energy
Poets usually utilize allusion to __________.
deepen a poem’s significance
Which of the following sentences might be a paraphrase of the declaration “Little we see in Nature that is ours”?
Individuals no longer feel that they are part of nature.
In “The World Is Excessive with Us,” what accounts for individuals’s being “out of tune”?
their over-involvement with financial aspects of life
The dominant image used in the middle of the poem is the image of– a river rupturing from underground
Which is a favorite subject of the Romantics and is most obvious in “Kubla Khan”?
How does the pleasure-dome originated?
Kubla Khan orders it constructed.
In lines 15-16, “As e’er beneath a waning moon was haunted/ By lady wailing for her demon-lover!,” alliteration is found in the words– waning, woman, wailing
The pleasure-dome is positioned– amid forests, hills, gardens, and chasms
According to lines 6-7, what is the size of Kubla Khan’s pleasure-dome?
Ten square miles
In “Kubla Khan,” Coleridge utilizes alliteration to develop– a captivated mood
The speaker’s vision unexpectedly alters with the image of the– damsel with the dulcimer
What is unusual about the spiritual river Alph?
It goes underground.
In the verse beginning on line 12, the speaker explains the gorge as– haunted and wild
The pleasure-dome encloses which of the following?
gardens and forests
The last image of “Kubla Khan” is that of the
poet feverish with inspiration.
The speaker in “Kubla Khan” describes a– vision he has actually had
The speaker thinks that, if he could “revive” within him the Abyssinian housemaid’s song, he would can
recreating the pleasure-dome.
Which sentence mentions a crucial style of “Kubla Khan”?
Nature has supernatural powers.
Who was Kubla Khan?
In line 5 of “Ode to the West Wind,” what are the “Pestilence-stricken wide varieties”?
leaves
Each area of Shelley’s “Ode to the West Wind” contains twelve lines in terza rima; in other words,– three-line verses with interlocking rhyme
With which season does the speaker associate the west wind?
Fall
What does Shelley imply by these words in “Ode to the West Wind”?
The night is like a burial place.

Which sentence best paraphrases this passage from “Ode to the West Wind”?

… share/ The impulse of thy strength … O unmanageable!

The descriptions of the West Wind in the very first 2 areas of “Ode to the West Wind” are controlled by pictures of
violence, death, decay, and burial.
The expression “the necromancy of this verse” in line 65 shows that Shelley considers poetry as comparable to– magic, prediction, or religious beliefs
Each area of Shelley’s “Ode to the West Wind” ends with a(n)– “Thou,”used throughout
the poem, describes– the wind In order to be lifted by

the west
wind, the speaker wishes to be any of the following products except a– boat In part I of”Ode to the West Wind,” the
speaker recommends that the west wind maintains seeds. Each of the five sections of “Ode to the West Wind “– has the type of a sonnet In

“Ode to the West Wind,”which image

finest reveals the speaker’s wish for the West Wind? “Make me thy

lyre, even as the forest is …”What
images do the lines from” Ode to the West Wind “suggest? Loose clouds like earth’s decomposing leaves are shed,

/ Shook from the tangled boughs of Heaven and Ocean … Heaven and Ocean are

like large trees. The speaker in “Ode to a Grecian Urn” claims that tunes that are never ever heard are– lovelier than heard tunes The speaker in”When I Have Fears”compares the content of great books

to– an abundant harvest In the poem,”Ode to a Grecian Urn
“, the couple is frozen– at the minute of pursuit In lines 11-14 of” Ode
on a Grecian Urn,”the
speaker is praising the powers of the human imagination. The speaker’s worry in

” When I Have Worries”causes him

to– attempt to forget love and fame In the first two lines of the poem

, what type of images does Keats use as

metaphors for the urn? Metaphors of marriage and household In”When I Have Fears That I May Stop to Be,”what is Keats signifying in the
image of “high-piled books” that”Hold like rich garners the complete ripened grain”? Which of the following passages offers the very best

example of imagery?”To what green altar, O mystical priest,/ Lead’st thou that heifer lowing at

the skies,/ And all her silken flanks
with garlands dressed?” Which line best paraphrases this excerpt from”When I Have Worries That I May Stop to Be”? And when I feel, fair creature of an hour, That I shall never ever consider thee more … In Line

2 of “When I Have Worries …,”which checks out, “[ b] efore my pen

has glean ‘d my bristling brain,” which of the following develops assonance? the long e sound The painting of the couple on the urn on”

Ode to a Grecian Urn “reminds the speaker of– the short lived nature of existence For Keats in”Ode on

a Grecian Urn, “the lovers imagined on the

urn symbolize his theme of eternal youth and hope. In

lines 1-4 of “When I Have Worries …,” the speaker fears that he will die before he has written all that he wants. What do you believe Keats indicates in these lines from”When I Have

Worries That I May Stop to Be
“? I may never live to trace/ Their shadows, with the magic hand of possibility … I might never live to discuss

them. In”When I Have Fears …,”how does the
speaker describe the books he intends to write? He compares them to grain harvests. The speaker in

“Ode to a Grecian Urn”feels that the urn– will outlive him

Who is the “fair creature of an hour” in line 9 of”When I Have Fears”? The

speaker’s cherished The line” willows bleach, aspens shudder “shows Tennyson’s usage of– alliteration and

assonance Sir Lancelot’s reaction to the death of the Lady of Shalott could best be described as– uninvolved but

supportive What do the following lines from the poem suggest?” And down the river’s dim

expanse/ Like some strong seër in a hypnotic trance,/ Seeing all his

own mischance–/ With a glassy countenance/ Did she want to Camelot.”She understands she will not make it to
Camelot. The mirror reveals the Lady of Shalott her
— tapestry and shadowy images of the world outside The Girl of Shalott
can see Camelot only by taking a look at

its reflection in a mirror. The image that best foreshadows, or hints at, the ending

of the poem is the– mirror splitting
” from side to side” In kind and material,”The Lady of Shalott”remembers medieval romances. The Lady of Shalott passes away while– drifting
down the river in a boat The Lady of Shalott lastly leaves the island since of– the

sight of Sir Lancelot One part

of Tennyson’s message in”The Lady of Shalott “is the social

isolation of artists. One significant attribute of “The Woman of Shalott”that contributes to its spoken music is the– routine rhyme plan The crisis, or turning point, in the poem

is the Lady of Shalott’s awareness that she no longer wants to– cope with
shadows The reapers know the Lady of Shalott’s presence on the island because– they hear her singing Why may the Girl in”The
Lady of Shalott “not leave her island? A curse is

on her that prohibits her doing so.
In what ways is the Woman in”The Lady of Shalott” like an artist? She weaves a magic web. What incident

irritates the Indian populace? Fleete grinds a
stogie butt into the stone image of Hanuman, the monkey god.

Who is the Silver Male
? An Indian struggling with leprosy In
“The Mark of the Monster,” which of the following

represents the internal conflict of the story? storyteller is ashamed of

his behavior Outrage is the
name of a– horse Some elements of this story mention– a New Testimony revelation about a fantastic monster that

marks its fans What occasion brings the English characters together in the very first scene? The characters are
participating in a New Year’s
Eve bash at a colonial station. In “The Mark of the Monster,” what rhetorical gadget does the title consist of? allusion After
Fleete is marked by the Silver Guy, he

— yearns for meat, groans, and ends up being increasingly animal-like In” The Mark of the Monster,”what criminal activity does

Fleete commit in his state of
drunkenness? he puts a cigar out on the statues forehead The

Englishmen make a cultural allusion when they point out that– in

H.M.S. Pinafore an unknown sound is credited to a cat The point of view used in this

story is– very first individual The saying
quoted at the start of the story suggests the– opposition of Eastern and Western systems of belief