of mice and men tension chapter 3

of mice and guys tension chapter 3

How Does Steinbeck Create Stress in chapter 3 in Of Mice and Men Steinbeck creates tension by making the environment prior to Curley’s pet gets shot very uncomfortable. He does this by writing about how little sounds draw everybody’s attention in the space to it: “He rippled the edge of the deck nervously, and the little snapping sound drew the eyes of all guys in the room, so that he stopped doing it.” This quote provides a sense of tension, because tiny things like rippling cards can drew everybody’s attention.

This makes it look like a really peaceful atmosphere. While everyone’s attention is drawn to the small sounds, Sweet just stares at the ceiling and eventually rolls over. This makes the reader feel that all Sweet can think about is his pet dog being shot, and this also brings a tense feel. Stress is also developed by Steinbeck utilizing the word ‘silence’ to describe the environment of the room leading up to the canine being shot. The characters do not want the silence present, meaning the shot will be heard by Sweet.

This will increase the uncomfortable atmosphere in the space because no one is quite sure regarding how Sweet can be comforted. Slim shots to break the silence in the space by telling Candy that he can have among his puppies. Slim tells Candy that he “can have any of them puppies he wants.” Nevertheless, Candy declines to acknowledge his offer, strengthening the currently tense atmosphere in the bunkhouse. How Does Steinbeck Produce Tension in Chapter Three in Of Mice and Men Steinbeck creates tension by making the atmosphere before Curley’s canine gets shot very awkward.

He does this by discussing how small noises draw everyone’s attention in the space to it: “He rippled the edge of the deck nervously, and the little snapping noise drew the eyes of all men in the room, so that he stopped doing it.” This quote offers a sense of tension, because small things like rippling cards can drew everybody’s attention. This makes it appear like a really quiet atmosphere. While everyone’s attention is drawn to the small noises, Sweet just looks at the ceiling and ultimately rolls over.

This makes the reader feel that all Sweet can think of is his pet dog being shot, and this also brings a tense feel. Stress is likewise developed by Steinbeck using the word ‘silence’ to explain the atmosphere of the room leading up to the dog being shot. The characters do not desire the silence present, indicating the shot will be heard by Candy. This will increase the awkward environment in the space because nobody is rather sure as to how Candy can be comforted. Slim shots to break the silence in the space by telling Sweet that he can have one of his puppies.

Slim tells Candy that he “can have any of them pups he desires.” Nevertheless, Candy declines to acknowledge his deal, reinforcing the already tense environment in the bunkhouse. How Does Steinbeck Produce Stress in Chapter Three in Of Mice and Male Steinbeck creates tension by making the atmosphere before Curley’s pet gets shot very uncomfortable. He does this by writing about how little sounds draw everybody’s attention in the room to it: “He rippled the edge of the deck nervously, and the little snapping sound drew the eyes of all guys in the room, so that he stopped doing it. This quote offers a sense of tension, because small things like rippling cards can drew everyone’s attention. This makes it seem like a really peaceful environment. While everybody’s attention is drawn to the small sounds, Candy simply gazes at the ceiling and ultimately rolls over. This makes the reader feel that all Sweet can think of is his pet being shot, and this likewise brings a tense feel. Stress is likewise created by Steinbeck using the word ‘silence’ to describe the atmosphere of the space leading up to the dog being shot. The characters do not want the silence present, suggesting the shot will be heard by Sweet.

This will increase the awkward atmosphere in the room because nobody is rather sure regarding how Candy can be comforted. Slim tries to break the silence in the space by telling Sweet that he can have one of his puppies. Slim tells Candy that he “can have any of them puppies he wants.” Nevertheless, Candy refuses to acknowledge his offer, strengthening the already tense atmosphere in the bunkhouse. How Does Steinbeck Create Tension in Chapter Three in Of Mice and Male Steinbeck develops stress by making the atmosphere prior to Curley’s dog gets shot really uncomfortable.

He does this by discussing how little noises draw everybody’s attention in the room to it: “He rippled the edge of the deck nervously, and the little snapping noise drew the eyes of all guys in the space, so that he stopped doing it.” This quote gives a sense of tension, given that small things like rippling cards can drew everybody’s attention. This makes it seem like a very peaceful atmosphere. While everybody’s attention is drawn to the small noises, Candy simply gazes at the ceiling and eventually rolls over.

This makes the reader feel that all Sweet can think about is his pet dog being shot, and this likewise brings a tense feel. Tension is also developed by Steinbeck using the word ‘silence’ to describe the environment of the space leading up to the canine being shot. The characters do not want the silence present, implying the shot will be heard by Candy. This will increase the uncomfortable atmosphere in the room since no one is rather sure regarding how Candy can be comforted. Slim tries to break the silence in the space by informing Sweet that he can have one of his puppies.

Slim tells Candy that he “can have any of them puppies he desires.” Nevertheless, Sweet declines to acknowledge his deal, enhancing the currently tense environment in the bunkhouse. How Does Steinbeck Create Stress in Chapter Three in Of Mice and Guy Steinbeck produces tension by making the atmosphere prior to Curley’s canine gets shot extremely uncomfortable. He does this by blogging about how small noises draw everybody’s attention in the space to it: “He rippled the edge of the deck nervously, and the little snapping sound drew the eyes of all men in the room, so that he stopped doing it. This quote offers a sense of stress, considering that small things like rippling cards can drew everyone’s attention. This makes it appear like an extremely quiet environment. While everyone’s attention is drawn to the small sounds, Candy just gazes at the ceiling and eventually rolls over. This makes the reader feel that all Candy can think about is his canine being shot, and this likewise brings a tense feel. Stress is likewise produced by Steinbeck using the word ‘silence’ to describe the environment of the space leading up to the pet dog being shot. The characters do not want the silence present, meaning the shot will be heard by Candy.

This will increase the awkward environment in the room because no one is rather sure regarding how Sweet can be comforted. Slim shots to break the silence in the room by telling Sweet that he can have one of his young puppies. Slim tells Candy that he “can have any of them puppies he wants.” Nevertheless, Sweet refuses to acknowledge his deal, enhancing the currently tense atmosphere in the bunkhouse. How Does Steinbeck Develop Stress in Chapter Three in Of Mice and Male Steinbeck develops stress by making the atmosphere before Curley’s pet dog gets shot very awkward.

He does this by writing about how little noises draw everybody’s attention in the space to it: “He rippled the edge of the deck nervously, and the little snapping noise drew the eyes of all men in the space, so that he stopped doing it.” This quote gives a sense of tension, considering that tiny things like rippling cards can drew everybody’s attention. This makes it look like a very quiet atmosphere. While everyone’s attention is drawn to the small noises, Candy just stares at the ceiling and ultimately rolls over.

This makes the reader feel that all Candy can consider is his pet dog being shot, and this likewise brings a tense feel. Tension is likewise created by Steinbeck using the word ‘silence’ to explain the atmosphere of the space leading up to the pet dog being shot. The characters do not desire the silence present, implying the shot will be heard by Sweet. This will increase the awkward atmosphere in the space since no one is quite sure regarding how Sweet can be comforted. Slim tries to break the silence in the room by telling Sweet that he can have among his puppies.

Slim informs Candy that he “can have any of them puppies he desires.” Nevertheless, Sweet refuses to acknowledge his offer, enhancing the already tense atmosphere in the bunkhouse. How Does Steinbeck Develop Tension in Chapter 3 in Of Mice and Men Steinbeck develops tension by making the atmosphere prior to Curley’s dog gets shot very awkward. He does this by blogging about how little noises draw everyone’s attention in the room to it: “He rippled the edge of the deck nervously, and the little snapping sound drew the eyes of all men in the space, so that he stopped doing it. This quote offers a sense of tension, considering that tiny things like rippling cards can drew everybody’s attention. This makes it seem like an extremely peaceful environment. While everybody’s attention is drawn to the little noises, Sweet simply stares at the ceiling and eventually rolls over. This makes the reader feel that all Candy can think about is his canine being shot, and this also brings a tense feel. Stress is likewise produced by Steinbeck utilizing the word ‘silence’ to describe the environment of the space leading up to the dog being shot. The characters do not want the silence present, suggesting the shot will be heard by Sweet.

This will increase the awkward atmosphere in the space due to the fact that no one is rather sure regarding how Candy can be comforted. Slim tries to break the silence in the room by informing Candy that he can have one of his young puppies. Slim tells Candy that he “can have any of them pups he desires.” However, Candy refuses to acknowledge his deal, reinforcing the already tense environment in the bunkhouse. How Does Steinbeck Produce Tension in Chapter Three in Of Mice and Male Steinbeck produces tension by making the environment before Curley’s canine gets shot really awkward.

He does this by discussing how small noises draw everyone’s attention in the space to it: “He rippled the edge of the deck nervously, and the little snapping sound drew the eyes of all guys in the room, so that he stopped doing it.” This quote gives a sense of tension, since tiny things like rippling cards can drew everybody’s attention. This makes it look like a very quiet environment. While everybody’s attention is drawn to the small noises, Candy simply gazes at the ceiling and eventually rolls over. This makes the reader feel that all Sweet can think about is his pet dog being shot, and this also brings a tense feel.

Tension is likewise created by Steinbeck utilizing the word ‘silence’ to explain the environment of the room leading up to the pet being shot. The characters do not want the silence present, implying the shot will be heard by Candy. This will increase the uncomfortable environment in the space because no one is quite sure as to how Candy can be comforted. Slim shots to break the silence in the space by telling Candy that he can have one of his puppies. Slim tells Candy that he “can have any of them puppies he desires.” However, Sweet declines to acknowledge his deal, reinforcing the currently tense environment in the bunkhouse.