Romeo and Juliet Act Ii Scene 3 Soisliloquy Analys

Romeo and Juliet Act Ii Scene 3 Soisliloquy Analys

Juliet’s Soliloquy Analysis Upon the opening of Act III, Scene II of William Shakespeare’s drama, Romeo and Juliet, Juliet reveals her impatience while waiting on night to come soon after her marital relationship with Romeo. In the beginning, Juliet urges the sun to “gallop apace … towards Phoebus’ accommodations” (3. 3. 1-2) in order to swiftly bring about night time so that she might be begin her love with Romeo. Juliet is unwilling to wait for night time and advises the gods to summon the night, pleading to Greek gods despite the fact that she is an Italian Catholic. Moreover, the word ‘gallop’ recommends quick motion.

Juliet further demonstrates her urgency when she commands the sky to “bring in cloudy night right away” (3. 2. 4), revealing both her impatience and her sense of secrecy. In addition, her repeatings of the word ‘come’ when she states “come, night; come, Romeo; come” (3. 2. 17) indicates her agitation while urging the 2 to show up with haste. Additionally, Juliet compares herself to “a restless child that hath new robes/ and may not wear them” (3. 2. 32-33), exposing her childish eagerness for the night to come. Juliet’s soliloquy has an impatient tone, highlighted through her imagery and syntax.

Upon the opening of Act III, Scene II of William Shakespeare’s drama, Romeo and Juliet, Juliet reveals her impatience while awaiting night to come shortly after her marriage with Romeo. Initially, Juliet advises the sun to “gallop apace … towards Phoebus’ lodging” (3. 3. 1-2) in order to swiftly cause night time so that she might be start her love with Romeo. Juliet hesitates to wait for night time and advises the gods to summon the night, pleading to Greek gods although she is an Italian Catholic. Additionally, the word ‘gallop’ recommends quick movement.

Juliet further demonstrates her seriousness when she commands the sky to “generate cloudy night instantly” (3. 2. 4), revealing both her impatience and her sense of secrecy. Moreover, her repetitions of the word ‘come’ when she says “come, night; come, Romeo; come” (3. 2. 17) shows her agitation while urging the 2 to arrive with haste. Additionally, Juliet compares herself to “an impatient child that hath brand-new bathrobes/ and may not wear them” (3. 2. 32-33), exposing her childish eagerness for the night to come. Juliet’s soliloquy has an impatient tone, showed through her images and syntax.