Symbolism in The Catcher in the Rye

Importance in The Catcher in the Rye

“If you need to ask what it represents, it didn’t,” mentioned well-known American movie critic and film writer Roger Ebert. In J.D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye, the protagonist Holden Caulfield applies to the reader that things in the novel in fact represent something. The red searching hat represents Holden’s uniqueness and individuality. Another symbol exposes about how Holden desires the world to be. The Museum of Nature’s displays interest Holden due to the fact that they never ever change.Symbols uncover how Holden sees his life. The ducks in Central Park disappear every winter season and come back in the spring. Holden wonders if the ducks in fact understand where they are going, and if he understands what he is finishing with his life. The three significant signs in “The Catcher in The Rye” are the red searching hat, the Museum of Natural History, and the ducks in Central Park.
The red hunting hat represents Holden’s uniqueness and individuality. For instance, “I still had my red searching hat on, with the peak around to the back and all. I actually got a bang out of that hat” (18 ). Holden actually liked and appreciated his red hunting hat. The hat likewise exposes how much it has actually helped Holden alienate himself from other people. Additionally, “Then why she did– it damn near killed me– she reached in my coat pocket and she took out my red hunting hat” (118 ). Phoebe understands how much the hat meant to Holden. Phoebe likewise respects about how Holden feels about the world. The red searching hat unveils how Holden isolates himself from others while wearing it.
The museum’s display screens interest Holden since they never alter. For instance, “The very best thing, though, in that museum was that whatever stayed right there where it was” (119 ). Holden does not like things that change. It likewise shows that Holden wishes that everything would stay the same. Additionally, “Nobody ‘d move No one ‘d be various. The only thing that would be various is you” (120 ). This signifies that Holden does not want to alter, nor does he wish to grow up. The Museum of Natural History truly represents the idea of Holden’s worry of entering into the adult years.
Since the ducks vanish every winter season, and return every spring. From this, Holden thinks about if the ducks really know where they are going and if he understands what he is making with his life. For instance, “You know those ducks in that lagoon right near Central Park South? Do you take place to know by any opportunity?” (60 ). Holden wants to discover when the ducks moved. It likewise reveals that Holden compares the ducks’ migration to his life. In addition, “Does somebody in a truck or something and simply take them away, or do they fly away on their own– go south or something?” (60 ). Holden would like to know why the ducks disappear and later on, come back. Symbolic of Holden’s confusion, the ducks in Central Park make Holden review his life; exploring if the ducks are as unaware with their life as he is with his.
It becomes apparent that three significant signs in J.D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye are the red hunting hat, the Museum of Nature, and the ducks in Central Park. Holden tries to separate himself from other individuals. The red hunting hat represent Holden’s alienation and individuality. Holden also wishes that the world would change the method he wants it to. The Museum of Nature’s screens interest Holden since they never alter. Holden likewise demonstrates how he compares animals’ lives to his life. Holden questions if the ducks in fact know where they are going when they delegate migrate.